5 popular destinations for travelling where disease is still rife Chased by sheep – Little Bedwyn Taking a long walk…. Great Bedwyn -> Little Bedwyn Sunday on the canal Crofton Meadows -> Great Bedwyn Wolf Hall -> Crofton Meadows Brimslade -> Wolf Hall My first Zander Wotton Rivers -> Brimslade Most visited sites on the internet ABS LP110 Leisure battery for a narrowboat Burbage wharf Mooring in Wootton Rivers, Wiltshire Sunday in Pewsey Measuring the draft Looking for moorings around Wootton River/Clench New button fitted! Milkhouse Water, Wiltshire Now in Pewsey, CRT mooring rules Get into Stonehenge free Flaperon from MH370; no story – 1 month on Skyrim V Connect/’sign in’ to ‘open network’ wifi on Windows 10 My personal Strava movie – 2016 The biggest hacks of 2016 – A year in hacking US vs Bullying China Russian Google and Reddit misdirects skewing Google Analytics First complaint Winter electricity usage Devizes The fight for freedom, Not In My Back Yard Donald Trump – Puppet masters, Parody to victory, and the march to nationalism US Presidential elections 2016 Taking a narrowboat on the Thames Giles Wood – Melksham Bonny Journey List of dead bankers 2016 – conspiracy update Day 38 – Taunton to Exeter Day 37 – Seend Park to Taunton Day 36 – Seend Park to Bradford on Avon Day 49 – Caen Hill Marina to Seend Park Bleeding a BMC 1800 marine engine 3 Reasons you won’t ever tell me 9/11 was not an inside job Day 48 – Caen Hill Locks Day 47 – Devizes – Caen Hill Locks Day 47 – Honey Street to Devizes Day 46 – Great Bedwyn to Honey Street Day 45 – Newbury to Great Bedwyn Day 43 – Theale to Newbury Day 42 – Goring to Theale Day 41 – Oxford to Goring Day 40 – Aynho to Oxford Day 39 – Claydon to Aynho Day 38 – Flecknoe to Claydon Day 37 – Ansty to Flecknoe Day 36 – Alvecote to Ansty Day 35 – Kings Bromley to Alvecote Day 34 – Little Haywood to Kings Bromley News Winter moorings Day 33 – Stone to Little Haywood Day 32 – Kidsgrove to Stone Day 31 – Wheelock to Kidsgrove Cask ale week – Use your mobile to claim free beer Chimney repairs Day 30 – Marston to Wheelock Day 29 – Dunham Massey to Marston Viewranger mapping app Day 28 – Plank Lane to Dunham Massey Day 27 – Crooke to Plank Lane The anti-Blair cometh…. Day 26 – Rufford to Crooke Day 25 – Morecambe to Rufford – 1,000th post eva! Six companies are about to merge into the biggest farm-business oligopoly in history Day 25 – Hawes to Morecambe Day 24 – Durham to Hawes Day 23 – Newcastle to Durham Day 22 – Norham to Newcastle Day 21 – Edinburgh to Norham Day 20 – Dundee to Edinburgh Day 19 – Aberdeen to Dundee Day 18 – Buckie to Aberdeen Day 17 – Inverness to Buckie Day 16 – Helmsdale to Inverness Day 15 – Helmsdale Day 14 – John O’Groats to Helmsdale Inverness and over the border Travelling by train with a bike UNESCO PLACES OF WORSHIP Day 11 – Tarleton to St. Mary’s Marina, Rufford Day 10 – Tarleton lock Day 9 – Crooke to Tarleton Day 8 – Plank Lane to Crooke Day 7 – Grappenhall to Leigh Day 6 – Marston to Grapplington Bonny Journey – Day 5 – Church Minshull to Marston Bonny Journey – Day 4 – Audlem to Church Minshull Bonny Journey – Day 3 – Gnosall to Audlem Bonny Journey – Day 2 – Calf Heath to Gnosall

Winter electricity usage

Michael Tyler

About

Owner and main contributor to the site.

It's only fair to share...Share on Facebook6Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0

I’ve just fitted this voltmeter after I’ve found myself constantly waking up with no electricity.

Not only this, when I turn the engine on at night, to charge the battery, I’m never sure how long I should run it for to charge the battery up. I’ve been suspecting that I’m not really having a clue what or how my electricity is being used, when it’s such a valuable resource on the boat.

12V Voltmeter

You need a simple instrument to tell you this.

12v Voltmeter
12v Voltmeter

It’s an inline voltmeter, and it cost about £40 from 12vPlanet, which sells all sorts of 12v accessories for caravans, boats and mobile homes.

In the picture, the engine is turned on, and the voltage is up to about 14v, which is right at the top of the scale.

I fitted this one myself by taking a line off the lighting loom, and running it to the meter.

There’s also a larger loom that the fridge runs on, but the cables are much thicker on that and the lower amperage serves. They’re coming from the same battery, and the voltage is the same.

Anyway

I put this voltmeter in yesterday, and I’ve been shocked at what seems to be using the energy.

This is the reading at 4pm, after charging the battery till 11am.

img_1986

As you can see, the voltage is around 12V.

And it stayed at this after charging my laptop up on the inverter until around 5pm. After that, it got dark.

This is what shocked me.

I thought it was the fridge running down all the power from the battery, but thanks to this device, I’ve discovered that it’s these.

img_1988

Simple, old-school filament lightbulbs, basically eating up the electricity.

And they sure do eat it.

Look at the voltmeter after I put the lights on.

img_1994

That’s the lowest setting, 10v.

This was taken at 18:46.

The amount of energy these tiny little bulbs must be pumping out must be amazing. And the evidence is all there.

12V energy saving bulbs

They’ve got to go.

I’ll be investing in some energy saving 12v bulbs very shortly.

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 Michael Tyler Sailor's Almanac: Further Narrowboat Adventures
(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)

Related Posts

4 comments:

  1. I am not at all surprised, Mike. They always looked nice, but if they’re anything like the ones in our old Eriba caravan, they use something similar to a car’s lights – and they just love electricity. I have replaced all of ours with LED downlights – no, I haven’t relpaced them, I’ve added to them, which means that they’ll only be used if or when we need bright light.
    And on THAT front, would you like to have one of these to hand (I have got one for caravan use, as it’s hell trying to work in small spaces with a candle!)
    http://www.screwfix.com/p/ae0292-portable-led-work-light-11w-220-240v/2564K?kpid=2564K&cm_mmc=Google-_-Product%20Listing%20Ads-_-Sales%20Tracking-_-sales%20tracking%20url&gclid=CLesv5yrvNACFUY8GwodQJMJpg

  2. Dad commented on Michael Tyler.:

    I am not at all surprised, Mike. They always looked nice, but if they’re anything like the ones in our old Eriba caravan, they use something similar to a car’s lights – and they just love electricity. I have replaced all of ours with LED downlights – no, I haven’t relpaced them, I’ve added to them, which means that they’ll only be used if or when we need bright light.
    And on THAT front, would you like to have one of these to hand (I have got one for caravan use, as it’s hell trying to work in small spaces with a candle!)
    http://www.screwfix.com/p/ae0292-portable-led-work-light-11w-220-240v/2564K?kpid=2564K&cm_mmc=Google-_-Product%20Listing%20Ads-_-Sales%20Tracking-_-sales%20tracking%20url&gclid=CLesv5yrvNACFUY8GwodQJMJpg

  3. LED is the way to go. we replaced all our bulbs in the caravan….much better….but be careful if you get the wrong ones they flicker….so I’ve read on the forum.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com